Welcome to Scott Baird's Cemetery Section
 

Last Updated May 23, 2013

 

 

 

 

Child Abuse in Texas (Published in the American Gravestone Studies Quarterly Newsletter, Spring 2005)
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From Mexican Army to Texas Senate (Published in the American Gravestone Studies Quarterly Newsletter, Winter 2005)
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Evers Family and German Texans (Published in the Amercian Gravestone Studies Quarterly Newsletter, Summer 2005)
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Tejano Heroes Memorialized in San Fernando Cemetery #1 (Submitted toThe Association of Gravemarkers for publication ,September 2009. Upon Request)
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Grieving Families and Sleepy Clerks: addressing differences between gravemarker and burial record data.  (Published inJournal of American and Comparative Culture.  Double Issue Vol. 25.3 & 25.4  Fall and Winter 2007, 333-46.
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German Lateiners, a paper tracking down the elusiveness of the so-called "intellectuals." (Published in The Journal of the German-Texan Heritage Society. XXXII.1, Spring 2010, 23-26.
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Private, Family, yet Universal.  Whether on private property or public, cemeteries provide a space for public mourning.  (Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Culture Association, San Diego, Spring 2005. (refereed)
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How "Latin" were the Latin Colonies?  (The Abstract and Works Cited for a paper presented at the 2008 annual meeting of the American Culture Association, San Francisco, Spring 2008. - referred)  At the time, the title was straightforward.  Texas history classes in my daughter's classes - then later in my grandchildren's classes - made brief mention of a group of Texas colonies where Texas German Immigrants actualy spoke Latin as part of their school curriculum.  I wanted to know if I could locate (non-Catholic Church) inscriptions on any gravemarkers.  I could not find any.  So never published my inclompleted research.  Subsequent research (See Lateiner at Rest...., below) has made the title of this paper rhetorical - maybe even satirical.
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Powerpoint supplement of How "Latin" were the Latin Colonies?
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From Ghost Town to San Antonio's Riverwalk: The Texas Freethinkers' Linguistic Trail.  (The Abstract and Works Cited for a paper presented at the annual meeting of American Culture Association, New Orleans, 2009. - refereed) .  Most of the history of the nineteenth immigrant German intellectuals (see "How 'Latin...., above) was written by a subgroup of these intellectuals, the Freethinkers.   As with the "How Latin...." research, cemetery research reveals that the actual Latin language usage of these immigrants was minimal. As with the previous research, these results were incomplete and inconclusive.  After two more years of cemetery research, I was finally able to separate the Freethinkers from the Intellectuals.  The result has been rewarding.  (See The Lateiner at Rest, below.)
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Powerpoint supplement of "From Ghost Town to San Antonio's Riverwalk."
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The Lateiner at Rest: Gravemarkers of the Lionized Texas German Intellectuals.  (Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Culture Association, San  Antonio, Spring 2011. - refereed)  An earlier, incomplete listing of Lateiner names now competes with a growing contemporary  listing - forming conterminous histories.  The early term, Lateiner, appears to be mostly derogatory; the contemporary one definitely complementary.   An expanded version of the paper has been submitted for publication.
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Powerpoint supplement of The Lateiner at Rest  (see above).
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A New Lateiner Blog.  Expanded version of "The Lateiner At Rest" (see above).  Published The Journal of the German Texas Heritage Society, summer 2012.
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